Open Source software and operational usability

A friend of mine linked me to Yaron Haviv's article "Did Amazon Just Kill Open Source" and I can't help but want to shout a reply

NO!

There is something in premise though, and it's something I keep trying to push as it's directly related to the work I do in my day job at Canonical.

Clouds have been shifting from IaaS to SaaS as sure as can be. They've gone from just getting your quick access to hardware on a "pay for what you use" system to providing you full self service access to applications you used to have to run on that hardware. They've been doing this by taking Open Source software and wrapping it with their own API layers and charging you for their operating of your essential services.

When I look at RDS I see lovely images for PostgreSQL, MySQL, and MariaDB. I can find Elasticsearch, Hadoop, and more. It's a good carrot. Use our APIs and you don't have to operate that software on the EC2 platform any more. You don't have to worry about software upgrades, backups, or scale out operational concerns. Amazon isn't the only cloud doing this either. Each cloud if finding the services it can provide directly to the developers to build products on. 

They've taken Open Source software and fixed delivery to make it easy to consume for most folks. That directly ties into the trend we have been working on at Canonical. As software has moved more and more to Open Source and the cost of software in the average IT budget drops, the costs of finding folks that can operate it at production scale has gotten much more expensive. How many folks can really say they can run Hadoop and Kubernetes and Elasticsearch at professional production levels? How hard is it to find them and how expensive is it to retain them? 

We need to focus on how we can provide this same service, but straight from the Open Source communities. If you want users of your software to be users of YOUR software, and not some wrapped API service, then you need to take those operational concerns into account. We can do more than Open Source the code that is running, we can work together as a community to Open Source the best practices for operating that software over the full life cycle of it. Too often, projects stop short at how to install it. The user has to worry about it long after it's installed. 

I have hope that tools like Juju and the Kubernetes can provide a way for the community around the software we use and love to contribute and avoid the lock in of some vendored solution of the Open Source projects we participate in today.